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bubblesyell02

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Jan 17, 2022
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Hello
So glad to have found this site and to learn everything I can about taking care and growing Fig trees and plants. Also pursuing a new passion "canning".
 

Shaft

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Aug 30, 2021
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Welcome to the forum, we are so glad to have you!

I bought my fiance a pressure canner for Christmas, we are going right there on that journey with you. Pro tip: if you don't get enough figs at once to make preserves, freeze the figs in a gallon sized bag until you do, as they accumulate over the season.
 

jmrtsus

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Aug 31, 2021
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Welcome! Some fig are not so good for canning and some were developed for processing. Choose wisely. Any fig will make a fig jam, fig preserves require a fig that does not break down to mush. Texas A&M developed "Alma" for processing, the LSU Gold is good. I believe the LSU Champagne pick firm ripe would make beautiful canned figs in clear jars, small yellow teardrops of joy. What you will find in processing figs is they were not developed for sweetness as that can be added in processing. They need a tough skin to handle shipping to the processing plants when picked "firm ripe" so they are not always a good fresh eating fig. Kadota is the most popular canned whole figs in the world. You don't really want a red interior for canning as it turns dark when cooked and stains the canning liquid so white/yellow firm figs with a light interior like a Kadota are prefered for appearance. Figs in a brown syrup just is not an appetizing thought. On the other hand as a 12 Y.O. on the famed "City of New Orleans" train I ordered "Kadota Figs in a Simple Syrup with Cream" for breakfast. Sooooo classy! Light yellow/green whole figs, firm, sweet and a crystal clears syrup with the heavy cream over them. I figured this is what Royalty eats every day! And my first fig that was not a Celeste. I had no Idea the Kadota would not be purple!

Other figs for processing with red interiors were developed by the University of California, Davis, CA (UCD) produced under Condit's tenure was the Conadria (first man made hybrid), Tena, and others with two newer ones Sierra and Sequoia. The UCD figs are all basically processing figs although the Sequoia is said to be a good fresh eating fig. I am on a waiting list for the last two and I have a mature Tena that produces OK fresh figs and outstanding dried figs. Enjoy the fig world and this Forum. Ask questions, great place to get answers and many opinions/options.
 

Shaft

Staff member
Registered
Fundamental
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
475
Welcome! Some fig are not so good for canning and some were developed for processing. Choose wisely. Any fig will make a fig jam, fig preserves require a fig that does not break down to mush. Texas A&M developed "Alma" for processing, the LSU Gold is good. I believe the LSU Champagne pick firm ripe would make beautiful canned figs in clear jars, small yellow teardrops of joy. What you will find in processing figs is they were not developed for sweetness as that can be added in processing. They need a tough skin to handle shipping to the processing plants when picked "firm ripe" so they are not always a good fresh eating fig. Kadota is the most popular canned whole figs in the world. You don't really want a red interior for canning as it turns dark when cooked and stains the canning liquid so white/yellow firm figs with a light interior like a Kadota are prefered for appearance. Figs in a brown syrup just is not an appetizing thought. On the other hand as a 12 Y.O. on the famed "City of New Orleans" train I ordered "Kadota Figs in a Simple Syrup with Cream" for breakfast. Sooooo classy! Light yellow/green whole figs, firm, sweet and a crystal clears syrup with the heavy cream over them. I figured this is what Royalty eats every day! And my first fig that was not a Celeste. I had no Idea the Kadota would not be purple!

Other figs for processing with red interiors were developed by the University of California, Davis, CA (UCD) produced under Condit's tenure was the Conadria (first man made hybrid), Tena, and others with two newer ones Sierra and Sequoia. The UCD figs are all basically processing figs although the Sequoia is said to be a good fresh eating fig. I am on a waiting list for the last two and I have a mature Tena that produces OK fresh figs and outstanding dried figs. Enjoy the fig world and this Forum. Ask questions, great place to get answers and many opinions/options.
You're on a waiting list for Sequoia?
 

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